Restoration in Hebrew comes from the root to heal

 
 

I went to Caesarea beach the other day with a friend.

She took me to the dunes of sand north to the power plant. “Many years ago you could still see here the grid of Caesarea’s ancient streets. The city was huge at Roman times and since then it never was as monumental, this is why probably most ceramics and glass scattered around are from Roman times.”

We collected remains of the gigantic culture.

I was arranging them in groups on my studio table, trying to make an order, restoration- as if they really belong to each other. Trying to make sense of bits and pieces thinking: Is that all that will be left of us, of me?

You might like to read this too: Reviving Ancient Alexandria Library, Athenian palimpsests, Alexandria remains, Remains, Restoration Drawings, 2013

This visit to Caesarea on 2011, is probably a blue print for Mound Hacker ongoing project started at 2013.

 

3 Responses to “Restoration in Hebrew comes from the root to heal”

  1. הי נונה פרוייקט מרתק. מזדהה עם הצורך בערוב תרבויות.
    באדמה הזו העפר של קיסריה יש ודאי גם עקבות שברי כדים פלסטיניים פרט לכל התרבויות האחרות
    אמשיך לעקוב נרשמתי.

    • Yael Nadler says:

      מרתק. אשמח להמשיך לקרוא.

      • nona says:

        תודה יעל,
        את מוזמנת ללחוץ על הקישורים למטה בפוסט- זה יביא אותך להמשך המסע.
        אעלה בקרוב עוד פוסטים .
        תודה שביקרת

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