Ithaca Ιθάκη

 
 

Ithaca By Kavafy read in Greek.

Ιθάκη
Σα βγεις στον πηγαιμό για την Ιθάκη,

να εύχεσαι νάναι μακρύς ο δρόμος,

γεμάτος περιπέτειες, γεμάτος γνώσεις.

Τους Λαιστρυγόνας και τους Κύκλωπας,

τον θυμωμένο Ποσειδώνα μη φοβάσαι,

τέτοια στον δρόμο σου ποτέ σου δεν θα βρείς,

αν μέν’ η σκέψις σου υψηλή, αν εκλεκτή

συγκίνησις το πνεύμα και το σώμα σου αγγίζει.

Τους Λαιστρυγόνας και τους Κύκλωπας,

τον άγριο Ποσειδώνα δεν θα συναντήσεις,

αν δεν τους κουβανείς μες στην ψυχή σου,

αν η ψυχή σου δεν τους στήνει εμπρός σου.

Να εύχεσαι νάναι μακρύς ο δρόμος.

Πολλά τα καλοκαιρινά πρωϊά να είναι

που με τι ευχαρίστησι, με τι χαρά

θα μπαίνεις σε λιμένας πρωτοειδωμένους·

να σταματήσεις σ’ εμπορεία Φοινικικά,

και τες καλές πραγμάτειες ν’ αποκτήσεις,

σεντέφια και κοράλλια, κεχριμπάρια κ’ έβενους,

και ηδονικά μυρωδικά κάθε λογής,

όσο μπορείς πιο άφθονα ηδονικά μυρωδικά·

σε πόλεις Αιγυπτιακές πολλές να πας,

να μάθεις και να μάθεις απ’ τους σπουδασμένους.

Πάντα στον νου σου νάχεις την Ιθάκη.

Το φθάσιμον εκεί είν’ ο προορισμός σου.

Αλλά μη βιάζεις το ταξίδι διόλου.

Καλλίτερα χρόνια πολλά να διαρκέσει·

και γέρος πια ν’ αράξεις στο νησί,

πλούσιος με όσα κέρδισες στον δρόμο,

μη προσδοκώντας πλούτη να σε δώσει η Ιθάκη.

Η Ιθάκη σ’ έδωσε το ωραίο ταξίδι.

Χωρίς αυτήν δεν θάβγαινες στον δρόμο.

Αλλο δεν έχει να σε δώσει πια.

Κι αν πτωχική την βρεις, η Ιθάκη δεν σε γέλασε.

Ετσι σοφός που έγινες, με τόση πείρα,

ήδη θα το κατάλαβες η Ιθάκες τι σημαίνουν.

Κωνσταντίνος Π. Καβάφης (1911)

Ithaca
When you set out on your journey to Ithaca,

pray that the road is long,

full of adventure, full of knowledge.

The Lestrygonians and the Cyclops,

the angry Poseidon — do not fear them:

You will never find such as these on your path,

if your thoughts remain lofty, if a fine

emotion touches your spirit and your body.

The Lestrygonians and the Cyclops,

the fierce Poseidon you will never encounter,

if you do not carry them within your soul,

if your soul does not set them up before you.

Pray that the road is long.

That the summer mornings are many, when,

with such pleasure, with such joy

you will enter ports seen for the first time;

stop at Phoenician markets,

and purchase fine merchandise,

mother-of-pearl and coral, amber and ebony,

and sensual perfumes of all kinds,

as many sensual perfumes as you can;

visit many Egyptian cities,

to learn and learn from scholars.

Always keep Ithaca in your mind.

To arrive there is your ultimate goal.

But do not hurry the voyage at all.

It is better to let it last for many years;

and to anchor at the island when you are old,

rich with all you have gained on the way,

not expecting that Ithaca will offer you riches.

Ithaca has given you the beautiful voyage.

Without her you would have never set out on the road.

She has nothing more to give you.

And if you find her poor, Ithaca has not deceived you.

Wise as you have become, with so much experience,

you must already have understood what Ithacas mean.

Constantine P. Cavafy (1911)



Images from Tiamat– video art, 2010.  A young  women teaches the sea its archetype names.

Information on my site with great Thanks to George Barbanis:  http://users.hol.gr/~barbanis/cavafy/

Poem read by: G P Savvides

Arriving at Ithaca

 

3 Responses to “Ithaca Ιθάκη”

  1. Shmuel de Leeuw says:

    This really great poem (how pity we can not hear the Greek spoken aloud) renders for the second time (Homer was the first) a tiny, out of the way island into a hilarious province in humankind’s soul. It renders also every reader of it into a modern Odysseus!
    How did you dig it out Nona — you are then a real digger…

  2. Shmuel de Leeuw says:

    Notice the first picture — the endless vast sea and the tiny eyes of the young woman mirror each other;
    The sea would be happy to encounter these devoted eyes, even as the sharing eyes are happy to be engaged archetypically with the sea.

  3. Nirit says:

    I read this poem a few times… think it is time-crossing, borderless and most acurate description of the human spiritual existance. It’s beautiful.

Leave a Reply

Nona Orbach is proudly powered by WordPress 4.8.6 Entries (RSS) Comments (RSS).